In case you haven’t heard, the National Weather Service (NWS)  instituted a flash flood watch tomorrow for the tri-state area. The full announcement from the NWS is copied and linked below, however, we’re more interested in what long-term solutions are available with regards to flooding in Hoboken? 

Hoboken streets, particularly on the western edge, often flood in heavy rain. This is an issue that isn’t going to go away, and one in which we need some real solutions. It can’t simply be something we only care about when floods happen. Venice makes it work. So can Hoboken.

Please send us any photos/comments to info@hobokeninc.com

Full NWS statement:

Heavy rain on Tuesday could cause urban flooding.

Flash Flood Watch in effect from late tonight through Tuesday afternoon.

The National Weather Service in Upton has issued a Flash Flood Watch for portions of southern Connecticut. Northeast New Jersey and southeast New York, including the following in southern Connecticut, Southern Fairfield. In Northeast New Jersey, Eastern Bergen, Eastern Essex. Eastern Passaic, Eastern Union, Hudson, Western Bergen. Western Essex, Western Passaic and Western Union. In Southeast New York, Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), northern Nassau, northern Queens, Richmond (Staten Island), Southern Nassau, southern Queens and Southern Westchester.

  • From late tonight through Tuesday afternoon.
  • Showers and thunderstorms with a warm frontal passage could produce Heavy Rain Heavy Rain capable of causing urban flash flooding in the New York City Metropolitan Area.
  • Rainfall of 1 to 2 inches, with local amounts as high as 3 inches and hourly rainfall rates of up to 2 inches per hour, are expected. While the heaviest rain is not expected to be widespread, urban areas that receive the heaviest amounts could experience disruptive impacts.
  • Despite dry conditions, some Fast-responding small streams in northeast New Jersey could approach Bank full if directly impacted. Larger streams and main stem Rivers should not experience flooding.